About Camden Hive

About Camden Hive

The borough of Camden is one of London's most buzzing and diverse places. Yet residents and those who work and play here sizzle with ideas to make it even better. Use the Camden Hive to attract the money and in-kind help you need to make your idea real. Ideas need to be costed, in Camden, and open to the public.

Our Journey

Help reopen Camley Street Natural Park hit its fundraising target!1 day ago

Brilliant news, thanks everyone!

Growing Raglan : Rewilding Camden hit its fundraising target!1 week ago

Brilliant news, thanks everyone!

Growing Raglan : Rewilding Camden
Growing Raglan : Rewilding Camden joined Camden Hive3 weeks ago

In partnership with Camden Council, Transition Kentish Town and Climate Emergency Camden (CEC) , this project is the first community based rewilding project on a council estate in Camden.

Help reopen Camley Street Natural Park
Help reopen Camley Street Natural Park joined Camden Hive3 weeks ago

Camley Street was saved from being turned into a lorry park in 1982, by Londoners, for Londoners, and it has been protected for the community ever since. It is the only nature reserve to be found in the densely populated Kings Cross and is visited by thousands of local people every year. The old building, which was erected in 1984 and has accommodated thousands of visitors, had a certain charm but was slowly falling apart. It was leaking, the wood had started to rot, poor insulation meant that it was freezing in winter and the bathrooms and kitchen were not the best. Something had to be done! We undertook months of community consultation to decide what was needed, how the site could be designed better and what we could offer local people in the future. In 2016 we approached the National Lottery Heritage Fund to start our mission to replace the building. We were successful in securing £1,098,000 of the £2,166,500 needed. Now we need your help to get over the finish line!

Growing Raglan : Rewilding Camden
Growing Raglan : Rewilding Camden joined Camden Hive3 weeks ago

In partnership with Camden Council, Transition Kentish Town and Climate Emergency Camden (CEC) , this project is the first community based rewilding project on a council estate in Camden.

Help reopen Camley Street Natural Park
Help reopen Camley Street Natural Park joined Camden Hive3 weeks ago

Camley Street was saved from being turned into a lorry park in 1982, by Londoners, for Londoners, and it has been protected for the community ever since. It is the only nature reserve to be found in the densely populated Kings Cross and is visited by thousands of local people every year. The old building, which was erected in 1984 and has accommodated thousands of visitors, had a certain charm but was slowly falling apart. It was leaking, the wood had started to rot, poor insulation meant that it was freezing in winter and the bathrooms and kitchen were not the best. Something had to be done! We undertook months of community consultation to decide what was needed, how the site could be designed better and what we could offer local people in the future. In 2016 we approached the National Lottery Heritage Fund to start our mission to replace the building. We were successful in securing £1,098,000 of the £2,166,500 needed. Now we need your help to get over the finish line!

Growing Raglan : Rewilding Camden
Growing Raglan : Rewilding Camden joined Camden Hive3 weeks ago

In partnership with Camden Council, Transition Kentish Town and Climate Emergency Camden (CEC) , this project is the first community based rewilding project on a council estate in Camden.

Help reopen Camley Street Natural Park
Help reopen Camley Street Natural Park joined Camden Hive3 weeks ago

Camley Street was saved from being turned into a lorry park in 1982, by Londoners, for Londoners, and it has been protected for the community ever since. It is the only nature reserve to be found in the densely populated Kings Cross and is visited by thousands of local people every year. The old building, which was erected in 1984 and has accommodated thousands of visitors, had a certain charm but was slowly falling apart. It was leaking, the wood had started to rot, poor insulation meant that it was freezing in winter and the bathrooms and kitchen were not the best. Something had to be done! We undertook months of community consultation to decide what was needed, how the site could be designed better and what we could offer local people in the future. In 2016 we approached the National Lottery Heritage Fund to start our mission to replace the building. We were successful in securing £1,098,000 of the £2,166,500 needed. Now we need your help to get over the finish line!